jadorefilm:

The Royal Tenenbaums(2001) dir. Wes Anderson

This is my adopted daughter, Margot Tenenbaum / I’m not in love with you any more / Of course it’s dark, it’s a suicide note / You used to be a genius / They just fell out of your pocket / Who? / She smokes / Why are you wearing pajamas? Do you live here? / I think we’re just gonna to have to be secretly in love with each other and leave it at that, Richie / The last six days have been the best six days of probably my whole life / Four minutes, forty-eight seconds. We’re all dead. Burned to a crisp. 

folkinz:

tvhangover:

How Anna Gunn’s Performance as Skyler White Changed Television.

Gunn’s performance was not that of an action heroine or a television genius, and it was not meant to be. Skyler carries the weight of Walt’s actions. Plenty of people hated her for it, Walt sometimes included. But Gunn’s performance pushed both Walt and the people who wanted to see him as a hero to increasingly contrived and ludicrous justifications for treating Skyler like she was a worse person than Walt.
Gunn’s drawn face in the last two seasons of “Breaking Bad” might not have brought about the end of the anti-hero era in television. But Gunn’s performance marked the end of a time when the creators of such shows could get away with writing anti-heroes’ wives as flat, cartoonish characters, or when audiences could get away with worshiping difficult men without encountering strong opposition.


Of all the Emmy’s Breaking Bad won the other day, I am most happy that Anna Gunn won.

folkinz:

tvhangover:

How Anna Gunn’s Performance as Skyler White Changed Television.

Gunn’s performance was not that of an action heroine or a television genius, and it was not meant to be. Skyler carries the weight of Walt’s actions. Plenty of people hated her for it, Walt sometimes included. But Gunn’s performance pushed both Walt and the people who wanted to see him as a hero to increasingly contrived and ludicrous justifications for treating Skyler like she was a worse person than Walt.

Gunn’s drawn face in the last two seasons of “Breaking Bad” might not have brought about the end of the anti-hero era in television. But Gunn’s performance marked the end of a time when the creators of such shows could get away with writing anti-heroes’ wives as flat, cartoonish characters, or when audiences could get away with worshiping difficult men without encountering strong opposition.

Of all the Emmy’s Breaking Bad won the other day, I am most happy that Anna Gunn won.

“There were some people who didn’t like the wolf scene. In particular one very important person. And he said, I don’t understand what this scene is doing in the movie. And I would always say to him, I’m not cutting it. That scene is why I’m making the movie.” - Wes Anderson

"And we stop and we see a wolf on a distant hill, and it’s a really beautiful, beautiful scene. It’s like so heart-warming because it’s just a beautiful moment between these foxes and little animals and this really like mysterious wolf who we’ve heard about the entire movie and who doesn’t talk in this scene and he’s not wearing clothes. He’s kind of, he represents I guess, the wild. He’s a wild wolf and animal, and it’s a beautiful moment where they have this great connection, and in that moment, it really like to me the point of that scene is let’s keep on being free. Let’s keep on being animals. And it’s such an uplifting moment, and like when I’ve seen it with audiences, a bunch of people break into huge cheers and hooting. It’s such an awesome, awesome scene. It really just blows my mind." - Jason Schwartzman